Grant for free neutering of menacing dogs

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23 December 2016

Whanganui District Council has received more than $47,000 from the Government for free neutering of menacing dogs.

The Department of Internal Affairs grant is part of an $850,000 nationwide neutering scheme announced in September 2016, aimed at reducing the risk and harm of dog attacks.

Proposed Government legislation making it compulsory for all dangerous and menacing dogs to be neutered is expected to take effect in February 2017.

Animal Management Team Leader Jo Meiklejohn says she is delighted the Council’s funding application was successful and the Animal Management Team has already begun contacting people who they know would appreciate the offer for free dog neutering.

“It is a great Christmas present for us and our community. Because of the neutering, we expect to notice less menacing breeds and cross-breeds over time. It is also positive for owners, who will no longer deal with unwanted puppies.”

She says the grant would not have been successful if the Council had not received support from local vets.

“Local vets will subsidise the price of neutering and expect to neuter 250 dogs within the grant’s available six-month period.”

The SPCA will promote the programme through its networks and the grant includes a generous advertising component to ensure the message is widely spread.

Please phone the Council on 349 0001 to register your interest and Animal Management will be in touch. The Council re-opens on Monday, 9 January 2017 at 8.00am.

Sign up to register your dog for desexing

What is a menacing dog?

To be eligible, your dog must be classified as menacing by breed/type or behaviour. A list of mencing dog types and breeds can be found here.

Under section 33A of the Dog Control Act 1996, a menacing dog must be considered by the Animal Management Team to pose a threat to any person, stock, poultry, domestic anima or protected wildlife because of any observed or reported behaviour or characteristics associated with the dog’s breed or type.

Page reviewed: 11 Jan 2017 10:59am